SCRIBD VS SLIDESHARE


I must confess that I am a Slideshare user.

I have, over a span of time, posted and shared various slides there and have not been disappointed in terms of impressions, reach, functionality across various platforms.

I then remembered that I had once tried a service called Scribd.

 

Scribd

 

Scribd is no longer merely a place for presentations.

When I went back to the site, It had morphed into something else!

Scribd has become the epicenter of academic document storage and sharing.

The first thing I noticed is they had socialized the platform with Facebook Aouth, which really transformed how the service permeates ones social network.

I immediately saw several of my Facebook friends with articles they had penned, were reading, or wished to share with others.

The idea for Scribd was originally inspired when Trip Adler was at Harvard and had a conversation with his father, John R. Adler about the difficulties of publishing academic papers.

Although their main competitors are listed on Wikipedia and Crunchbase as  Docstoc, edocr,WePapers, and Issuu, in my circles one uses either Scribd or Slideshare.

 

UPPERS

  • Very pervasive, ones documents have immediate reach to peers through the Facebook network.
  • Scribd supports a greater variety of document formats for upload, converting them into the iPaper format. (This has nothing to do with Steve Jobs, but is a derivative of Adobe PDF)
  • The site allows for much larger documents to be uploaded,much larger than Slideshare.

DOWNERS

  • Too many Ads,improperly placed, making the site look clunky and disorganized
  • From the publisher perspective, documents rights management is an issue.
  • The site is heavy to load and use
  • The structure of the site is bulky and scrolls endlessly.
  • They need to do a lot of work on the layout and presentation of documents and content.

 

Slideshare

 SlideShare is a business media site for sharing presentations, documents and pdfs.

 

This is how they tell their story:

SlideShare is the world’s largest community for sharing presentations. 45 million people use SlideShare every month for research, sharing ideas, connecting with others, and generating business leads.
SlideShare also supports documents, PDFs, and professional videos. Get an account.
You can upload your PowerPoint, OpenOffice and Keynote presentations, and your Word, Open Office documents. You can share them on your blog or website, or send a URL to friends by email. What’s more, the transcripts of your files will be indexed by Internet search engines and enhance the search engine ranking of your presentations & documents. You can also share on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn.
SlideShare is also a great place to find presentations and documents on almost any topic. You can search on the site, or find them through tags. Or you can find them  through the related list next to every document / presentation.

For advanced features and analytics, one needs to have a PRO account.

The website was originally meant to be used for businesses to share slides among employees more easily, but it has since expanded to also become a host of a large number of slides for business and fun.

Although the website is primarily a slide hosting service, it also supports documents, PDFs, videos and webinars. Think of it as a YouTube for documents.

SlideShare also provides users the ability to rate, comment on, and share the uploaded content.

SlideShare’s biggest competitors include Scribd.com, Issuu and Docstoc.

 

UPPERS

  • Slideshare is very easy to use and publish, and the SEO on the site is optimized so if your content is relevant it will be viewed beyond your immediate network.
  • Slideshare have integrated social and business sites Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter and allow you to easily embed the slides on a third party site.
  • Think of it as the YouTube of static presentations.
  • Slideshare has a very professional layout and is easy to move around the site.

DOWNERS

  • For some reason the fonts and behavior of the site reminds me strongly of LinkedIn, and tends to periodically have the same accessibility and log in errors that LinkedIn sometimes suffers from.
  • Analytics on views are locked into the Pro version.

 

CONCLUSION

If you have bulky documents to either archive or share, use Scribd. However  if you have presentations that you would like to be viewed Slideshare is the place to go.

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